Rational Number That Is Not an Integer


Question: How is a rational number that is not an integer different from a rational number that is an integer?

We will use the definition of the rational number to explain this question.

Answer: The difference between a rational number that is not an integer and a rational number that is an integer is that the denominator is not equal to 1 in the rational number that is not an integer.

A rational number is a number such that it can be expressed as the quotient or fraction p/q of two integers, a numerator p, and a non-zero denominator q. Every integer is a rational number.

Explanation:

A rational number that is not an integer is of the form p/q where p and q are integers and q is not equal to 0 or 1. For example, 5/2, 6/13 are rational numbers that are not integers.

A rational number that is an integer is p, where p is an integer. For example, -5, -2 are rational numbers that are integers.

Therefore, the difference between a rational number that is not an integer and a rational number that is an integer is that the denominator is not equal to 1 in the rational number that is not an integer.